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Changing rear brake pads guide

Discussion in 'Mk4 Ibiza FAQ's (6L) 2002-2008' started by MichalR, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. falcon7

    falcon7 Active Member

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    Windback woes

    Great DIY guide, thanks and still relevant.

    Should have looked here first though as I didn't realise I needed a windback tool. :whistle:

    Hope it arrives at the weekend as it's £30 cheaper on EBAY than Halfrauds.
     
  2. bigbawmcgraw

    bigbawmcgraw Active Member

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    How necessary is this wind back tool? I tried a G-clamp, a large set of swan neck pliers and a big screw driver (to stop the caliper moving against the turn of the pliers) and the piston wouldn't budge at all.
    After 2 hours of trying I've come to the conclusion the caliper is seized....2006 car and looks like original pads!
    Going to order 2 new calipers and a wind back tool.


    Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk
     
  3. RUM4MO

    RUM4MO Active Member

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    If you had used a windback tool then you would have given yourself the best chance to get these pistons back in if they have become a bit stiff - without that tool you are just left wondering if they are seized or just a bit stiff - or have you now buggared them by trying to get them back in using the wrong method?

    I've had a piston that was not easy to retract, but by applying the handbrake very slightly, it was possible to start retracting it - I don't know why that worked, but when you are in a tight spot sometimes you need to use your brains(?).

    The only piston that I have had that seized, was seized solid in as much as the brake was seizing sometimes and getting hot, that was the only time that I have had big problems with these callipers.
     
  4. bigbawmcgraw

    bigbawmcgraw Active Member

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    The caliper did seem to work before, in that it was grinding when pressed (yes it was knackered) but stopped grinding when I released the brake.
    I did open the reservoir and loosen off the bleed nipple but it still wouldn't move. I think it has an automatic adjustment mechanism within the caliper which has probably seized(?)
    Nvm, I'm getting a couple of new ones at cost price plus another tool to add to my collection
    Gone are the days when all you needed were 10, 13 and 17mm spanners to rebuild an entire car.

    Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk
     
  5. RUM4MO

    RUM4MO Active Member

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    ECP sell refurbished callipers, they supply them complete with new O-ring seals for the fluid banjo coupling, I think that it is Pagid that market them, Lucas, the original manufacturer of these callipers went out of business years ago and TRW bought over this part of the business - but maybe you know all that already. Anyway, you should consider buying external (handbrake) lever return springs as the internal ones in these callipers are not up to the job even on a short car like the Fabia/Polo/Ibiza - and if you don't fit them, you troubles will come back in a few years time, springs from the original Alhambra or Galaxy work.
     
  6. troopermk1

    troopermk1 Active Member

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    Does anyone know if the front callipers are fixed with an alun key 7 mm or 13mm nut?
     
  7. RUM4MO

    RUM4MO Active Member

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    If you are meaning the Ibizas with the FS111 256MM discs brakes, then it will be an allen key (that is all the cars with the smaller/lower powered engines).
     
  8. troopermk1

    troopermk1 Active Member

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    thankyou

    yes 1.2...apppeciate that :)
     
  9. troopermk1

    troopermk1 Active Member

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    odd...checked brakes...pads are all well within tolerance, but found a disk retaining screw missing from driver side....how important is this screw?
     
  10. Badger

    Badger Active Member

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    It just stops the disc moving when the wheel is off.

    The wheel, bolts and hub secure it in place anyway.

    They tend to rust and snap, my previous car was missing both, no issues.
     
  11. RUM4MO

    RUM4MO Active Member

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    These screws are that important that some cars including the B5 Passat does not even have a hole in the hub for them. Instead VW provided a plastic threaded peg that you screw in to a wheel fixing bolt hole to stop the disc rotating on the hub while you are fighting with getting the spare wheel on! I have bought a second plastic threaded peg to keep in wife's Polo tool kit - they make life easier as you can hang the next wheel on the hub while you fit the first couple of bolts. I also bought the heavier duty aluminium version from the big VW 4X4 for using in the garage, again very handy!
     
  12. IbizaSportRider

    IbizaSportRider Active Member

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    This is probably a stupid question but I gather the handbrake is kept off when doing this and when the brakes are pumped at the end this is with it remaining off?
     
    #72 IbizaSportRider, Apr 26, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2016
  13. RUM4MO

    RUM4MO Active Member

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    Yes, use the brake pedal to bring the pads out to make contact with the discs and hold, then operate the handbrake a few times firmly, you might need to take the car for a run to use the brakes a bit before you get a "good handbrake". Also if you have been living with a "bad or high handbrake" before doing this work, you might have adjusted the handbrake cable, if so, slacken the handbrake cable off and leave like that until the handbrake operation has optimised, then adjust the handbrake to lower the "handle" if necessary without causing grabbing/rubbing when off - you should just have slight clearance between the calliper levers and the end stops - though I tend to be generous and let the lever just rest on the end stops.
     
  14. ChrisKav1971

    ChrisKav1971 Active Member

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    Just been doing my rear discs and pads, did the fronts last week :D I looked in on this thread just to check there were no differences to how I did my Mk4 Golf's last year, can I just say that if your rear pistons are difficult to wind back using your fingers pull the rubber boot on the piston off it slightly and squirt some WD40 in there and leave for an hour, it worked for me :rofl:
    Don't use a screwdriver or pliers as you may split the boot.
     
  15. RUM4MO

    RUM4MO Active Member

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    Personally I would not use something like WD-40 where it is likely to come into contact with brake seals as I am not confidant that it will not cause them to swell up or otherwise degrade them - better to run some brake fluid in there if you need to loosen things up! Better still to remove and clean the piston surfaces of dust and rust?
     
  16. ChrisKav1971

    ChrisKav1971 Active Member

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    Fair comment but I'm not sure I'd put brake fluid in there as it's corrosive and the boot's only a dust cover. I've done the WD40 trick on my Mk2 Golf GTi, my Mk4 20vt and the ex-wife's MG ZR with no issues but you may have a point.
     
  17. RUM4MO

    RUM4MO Active Member

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    Brake fluid is not corrosive as far as harming anything in there, all you have inside that dust cover is the chromed steel piston, the alloy body of the calliper the "rubber" of the piston seal and the "rubber" of the dust seal. Years ago (too long ago) brake cylinders used to have a smear of rubber brake grease inside the dust covers maybe to keep some moisture out, these dust seals on callipers must always end up with letting some moisture in there.

    I think, but have never done this, that once these pistons start to get stiff, it is time to clean them up if possible and fit new seals as the seals are now hard and dragging the pistons back through them will damage the seals slightly.
     
  18. Bluebeeza

    Bluebeeza Active Member

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    Thanks for the guide, glad people are still active on these little guides. my pads and rotors are really bad all around and wont pass my next mot. ive got no mechanical experience and gonna tackle it myself hopefully it shouldnt be too difficult for a complete novice. anyone know which pads and rotors id need for an 06 petrol fr? i want some decentish 'upgrades' or branded pads like ebc or something, kinda want best value i guess. think ive got vw rears and feredo fronts atm.
     
    #78 Bluebeeza, Jul 5, 2016
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2016
  19. The Captain

    The Captain Active Member

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    Nice simple 'how to' guide.

    I recommend using the bleed nipple method when winding back pistons otherwise there is a risk that the seals in the master cylinder may become unseated or the lip reversed. When the job is complete, depress the brake pedal firmly several times to properly seat the pads and then check fluid levels top up with fresh brake fluid if necessary.

    Visit brakebook.com or use the Mintex on-line catalogue for details of brake components.

    I bought the Mintex brake box set MDK0037 (rear axle set of 2 x discs & 4 x pads) for my Ibiza - £33 delivered.
     
  20. AlexFR

    AlexFR Active Member

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    Nice one mate! Thank you!
     

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